Fri, Jun 5, 2020

Police confiscate Alcohol

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Cape Town - 1811015 - The City of Cape Town’s Law Enforcement Department disposed of nearly 12 000 litres of alcohol at the old abitoir in Ndabini. This is ahead of the festive season. The liquor was confiscated from beach goers and other people contravening alcohol consumption by-laws - Photographer:Tracey Adams/African News Agency(ANA)

by Rapule Moiloa

On the 25th of April law enforcement agents confiscated beers from one of the biggest taverns in Tembisa. The police suspects that the owner of the tavern has been selling alcohol secretly and illegally to people whilst defying lockdown rules and regulations. This lack of compliance forced the police by clearing all fridges that were filled with alcohol and two of the police vans that were used on that day were filled with alcohol.

Community Health Care workers during COVID-19

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By Dorothy Mabelebele

Community Health Care Workers (CHWs) plays an important part in the delivering of health care services to communities. CHWs have been crucial in health care system through various programmes including testing and preventing HIV and TB, treatment adherence as well a health promotion.

Sisanda Kulima, a CHW from an informal settlement called Lawley Clinic in Johannesburg, Gauteng has been a CHW for more than 10 years in which she participated in fighting for CHWs rights that were violated by the Department of Health. The Department of Health has been running around with the issues of making the CHWs permanent. Meanwhile CHWs are earning a stipend of R3,500 which Kulima said it is not enough for them because they risks their lives, visiting ill people in the communities daily without enough protection from any diseases.

The Department of Health announced that CHWs will be assisting in tracking and tracing COVID-19 cases but they didn’t give assurance of safety to these workers. It is unclear how the department is going to protect the CHWs in a situation with the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). “We have started with the screening for COVID-19 on 15 April 2020 at Fine Town in Johannesburg”, said Kulima.

There is a Petition making rounds on the social media about the Community Health Workers who are on the frontline who must be permanently employed and the petition was created by Change.org
Follow the link to sign the petition: http://chng.it/Dpz9wy9B

Infringement of human rights under pretext of enforcing lockdown- as livelihoods are threatened

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Anonymous…On the 8th of April one guy was beaten so badly by police here near my flat in Durban, Russell Street. We are really suffering because this has been happening since the lockdown started, sometimes they don’t even ask where you are going they just start beating you. Some of our papers have expired we can’t go for renewal because we even scared to go to home Affairs. We have a fear that we will be arrested after lockdown because we are now illegal citizens because we have no papers.

by Michael…It’s day 12 of the lock down as I am getting ready to go out, buy grocery for PACSA garden assistant. My what’s app is full of messages, other forwarded from PACSA Process Facilitators. As per government directive, for me to leave my house I need permit, classifying my work as essential service! I wonder if fighting for social justice is classified as one, human rights watch is one them, buying groceries for the garden assistant is one of those. First two  kilometers from my house road block. Here is my conversation with the police officers;

Police: Where are you going,

Me: Going to buy grocery

Police: Didn’t you buy before the lock down.

Me : I did, but this time is not mine, its for a colleague who is being paid on a daily basis depending on the work he does and as we are in a lockdown he is in a danger of hunger and starvation.

Empowering communities to tell their stories bears fruits

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By Thokozile Mntambo

 

Government intervention is vital for waste industry https://ubumbanovoice.com/2018/11/governments-intervention-vital-in-the-waste-industry/

2018.11.07

 

On the 7th of November I had an interview with Jozi FM where i aired my views on the significance of informal recycling in Thulani Snake park Soweto. I also expressed the need for government to regulate the waste industry so that community members are able to make a meaningful livelihood from collecting waste.

 

2018.11.08

 

The councillor of Thulani Snake Park approached me and asked if I can present the matter during a community meeting and make a petition. He wrote a notice of motion pertaining to the buy back centre in terms of Rule 89 of the standing rules of council.

 

The notice read:

Ward 129, Thulani Doornkorp is one of the poorest wards in the city of Johannesburg. As a result some residents have resorted to making a living through the collecting waste.

There is a council resolution to establish a buy back centre .This will enable the supporting of residents in the ward especially those who are making a living through collecting recyclables.

 

* Buy back centre will facilitate economic growth.

*Economically depressed areas need intervention to address poverty

* buy back centres will contribute to IDP programme of increasing Jo’burg economy growth by 5 %

 

2018.11.29

 

The Councillor then took this motion to the chamber and he sent an audio where he noted  that he was in agreement that Thulani Snake park  receives a buy back centre.

 

A buy back centre is a depot where individuals waste collectors can sell their recyclables.

 

Activist call for a clear communication strategy when it comes to COVID-19

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I am Amo Tshabalala in Sefikile Village North West Province under Moses Kotane Local Municipality. I think that is not fair for alliterate people as everything has happened so fast. It has affected us activists and everyone in the community so negatively. The illeterate people while they are still trying to understand what is this corona virus then the lockdown is effected and they don’t even know what lockdown is or what it means. Now we have to explain as community activists but its difficult since we can’t be seen outside along the road or anywhere for that matter without a serious reason. In my community/village they take everything serious even though they didn’t hear what you said exactly but they do what they think you said and in this case it is lockdown and they are indoors. People who are depending on piece jobs its hard for them now to put bread on the table as we all know that no unnecessary movement is allowed. Builders also got affected by this lockdown too as they also can’t do anything and we all know what that means, no food on the table again. Now, how many homes have no food on the table because of corona virus?

COVID 19 PLAN/STRATEGY
Every information should be written or given in indigenous languages but now I think everything has gone too much to social media and my concern is what about the illiterate people, those who can’t afford smart phones, and those who can’t afford data to get the info about corona virus? Information should be accessible by all including those in rural areas. We should work together and make sure that we are safe. #stayhomeandsafeyourfamily.

Let people pay for rates online

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by Rapule Moiloa in Tembisa Ekurhuleni

Since the announcement of level 4 lockdown last week, wearing of masks have been made mandatory when one is entering in shop, public transport and I have realised that service providers do not allow people to enter when they do not have masks. However, municipalities should avoid long ques in order to mitigate the spread of the pandemic by sending rate statements so that people start paying online to avoid congestion at municipalities.

COVID-19 – Its everyone’s responsibility to contain the spread

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By Mmabore Mogashoa

On the 12th of May 2020, I went to Jane Furse in Sekhukhune in South Africa. When I entered one of the shops they checked body temperature, sanitized people’s hands and only those with masks were allowed in. This shows how businesses are ensuring the health and safety of customers and employees. What worries me the most is people who move around the streets without masks. From GaMogashoa to Jane Furse you meet people with no masks and some sitting and enjoying drinks. People should know that it is our responsibility to safeguard our health and it is no time to take COVID-19 for granted. When I got home, I also found children playing and what suprised me is that they used tissues and plastic to make masks while playing. Nevertheless, if children can play and talk about COVID-19, why do adults find it difficult to wear masks.

Sewage in Emalahleni, Mpumalanga

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On the 25th of February at Vosman under Emalahleni municipality in Mpumalanga the sewer was leaking that it filled the whole home, home dwellers could not come out of the house as it happened at night. The poor installation of the sewer and the storage of the sewer drain by the planners is costing the community members.
Story by Vusi akaMabaso

Lack of hygiene at informal settlement cause for concern

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by Rapule Moiloa in Tembisa

An informal settlement is a place where many people build shacks because many are unemployed and do not even qualify for an Rdp house. One thing that i have observed is how people use one toilet in large numbers because toilets at the informal settlements are not owned by individuals or families and are used by more than ten people regardless of where the toilet is placed. What worries me the most is that these toilets are not disinfected and people at informal settlements are at high risk of contracting coronavirus due to lack of hygiene in the area.

Business as usual in Tembisa

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Rapule Moiloa…Old and young people in Tembisa Ekurhuleni still don’t adhere to lock down rules and regulations, kids play in waste dumping areas, burning papers and this shows that parents are not monitoring their kids during the lock down. My worry is that these kids play in dirty areas and their health is at risk and chances are slim that they wash their hands with soap.